Mask and Vaccine Requirements FAQ's

On September 3, 2021, the Governor signed Executive Order 21-22 which requires all individuals over the age of 2 and who can medically tolerate a face covering to wear a face covering when in indoor public places. The Executive Order also requires health care workers, school personnel, higher education personnel and students, and employees and contractors of state-owned or operated congregate facilities to be fully vaccinated, as described in the Order.

Face Covering Guidance

Who is required to wear a face covering indoors?

All individuals the age of 2 or over who can medically tolerate a face covering are required to wear a face covering over their nose and mouth when in an indoor public place.

All employees must wear face coverings in indoor workplaces.

Vaccine Provider Instructions

Guiding Principles for Providers

In order to promote a fair process for vaccine administration while vaccine supply is limited, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) is requiring all providers to help ensure that vaccine recipients self-verify their eligibility for the applicable prioritization group. Self-verification ensures the recipient truthfully indicates (verbally or otherwise) their specific category of eligibility to receive the vaccine.

Providers, as a best practice, will also request documentation or proof, such as personal identification, employee verification, or documentation of a qualifying health condition or disability to confirm the individual is in the priority population being served.

Guidance Affirming Non-Discrimination in Medical Treatment

This guidance is to affirm and supplement the State of Illinois’ April 10, 2020 Guidance Relating to Non-Discrimination in Medical Treatment for Novel Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19). Federal and State civil rights laws, including the Illinois Human Rights Act, prohibit discrimination in the delivery of healthcare and support the rendering of ethical, non-discriminatory decisions. These principles have equal and ever-important application in the context of administering the COVID-19 vaccine.

Monoclonal Antibodies

If your COVID-19 test result is positive, you may be able to receive a medication called a monoclonal antibody. The names of these medicines are bamlanivimab and casirivimab/imdevimab. They have been made available for emergency use during COVID-19.

These medications are used ONLY in mild or moderate cases of COVID-19, in high-risk adults and children. You cannot take these medicines if you are already in the hospital or using oxygen.

High risk means you have at least one of the following conditions:

  • Obesity
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Diabetes
  • Immunosuppressive disease
  • You take medicine that suppresses your immune system
  • 65 years of age or older
  • Less than 65 years with certain diseases of the heart, blood, or lung.

If you have a positive COVID-19 test and you are high risk; contact your healthcare professional as soon as possible. You must begin this therapy right away for it to be helpful.

COVID-19 Vaccine

Quarantine Guidance

On December 2, 2020, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new options for public health authorities to consider for establishing quarantine time frames for contacts of persons with SARS-CoV-2. Click here to review the full details on these new options.

The CDC currently recommends a quarantine period of 14 days. Further, local public health authorities determine and establish quarantine options for their jurisdictions and may decide to continue using a 14-day period and/or shortened options for certain lower risk close contacts. However, the following options to shorten quarantine are acceptable alternatives:

Violence Prevention and Support Resources

Sharing resources with everyone helps prevent violence in our communities

Mental health and crisis support

Illinois Call4Calm Text Line (24/7)

If you or a loved one are struggling with stress related to the COVID-19 pandemic and need emotional support, text TALK to 552020 for English or HABLAR for Spanish (Message and Data Rates May Apply. See Terms and Conditions of Use). People seeking assistance remain anonymous and provide only their first name and ZIP code, which enables the service to link them to a counselor in the area who is knowledgeable about available local resources.

Medical Care for Sexual Assault Survivors

Illinois Hospitals Are Ready and Safe for Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Survivors to Receive Medical Care

Sexual assault and domestic violence survivors come to hospitals to seek important medical and forensic care in their most vulnerable moments. During these tumultuous times, it is imperative that survivors know hospitals remain committed to providing these essential services to survivors who seek them. Hospitals work in collaboration with Illinois Coalition Against Sexual Assault rape crisis centers, the Illinois Coalition Against Domestic Violence, and other advocacy organizations to assist survivors.

Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children

This document serves as a reminder and aims to ensure that clinicians are aware of current guidance regarding Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) Associated with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), including the case definition and guidance on reporting to local health departments.

Current Illinois MIS-C Data

Illinois has received 199 reports of MIS-C from clinicians for cases through July 2021.These cases have been submitted to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for further reporting and review. Below is a graph depicting the reported cases by the onset month of their reported MIS-C illness. IDPH anticipates additional reports will be received as reporting for these cases can lag as the critical task of treating these patients becomes the clinicians’ priority.

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