COVID-19 Vaccine Administration Plan

The COVID-19 vaccine is a critical tool to safely reach the other side of this pandemic. Through efficient and effective distribution of the vaccine, we can suppress the spread of the virus, save as many lives as possible, and rebuild our economy. Illinois will only distribute a vaccine that is deemed safe. As we move through phases of vaccine distribution, the administration will ensure it reaches Illinoisans as quickly as possible using an equity-centric approach as we have done throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. As we move forward, it is critical that Illinoisans continue to follow public health recommendations to suppress the spread of the virus until vaccines are ready for widespread distribution.

Guidance Affirming Non-Discrimination in Medical Treatment

This guidance is to affirm and supplement the State of Illinois’ April 10, 2020 Guidance Relating to Non-Discrimination in Medical Treatment for Novel Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19). Federal and State civil rights laws, including the Illinois Human Rights Act, prohibit discrimination in the delivery of healthcare and support the rendering of ethical, non-discriminatory decisions. These principles have equal and ever-important application in the context of administering the COVID-19 vaccine.

Monoclonal Antibodies

If your COVID-19 test result is positive, you may be able to receive a medication called a monoclonal antibody. The names of these medicines are bamlanivimab and casirivimab/imdevimab. They have been made available for emergency use during COVID-19.

These medications are used ONLY in mild or moderate cases of COVID-19, in high-risk adults and children. You cannot take these medicines if you are already in the hospital or using oxygen.

High risk means you have at least one of the following conditions:

  • Obesity
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Diabetes
  • Immunosuppressive disease
  • You take medicine that suppresses your immune system
  • 65 years of age or older
  • Less than 65 years with certain diseases of the heart, blood, or lung.

If you have a positive COVID-19 test and you are high risk; contact your healthcare professional as soon as possible. You must begin this therapy right away for it to be helpful.

COVID-19 Vaccine

Quarantine Guidance

On December 2, 2020, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new options for public health authorities to consider for establishing quarantine time frames for contacts of persons with SARS-CoV-2. Click here to review the full details on these new options.

The CDC currently recommends a quarantine period of 14 days. Further, local public health authorities determine and establish quarantine options for their jurisdictions and may decide to continue using a 14-day period and/or shortened options for certain lower risk close contacts. However, the following options to shorten quarantine are acceptable alternatives:

Violence Prevention and Support Resources

Sharing resources with everyone helps prevent violence in our communities

Mental health and crisis support

Illinois Call4Calm Text Line (24/7)

If you or a loved one are struggling with stress related to the COVID-19 pandemic and need emotional support, text TALK to 552020 for English or HABLAR for Spanish (Message and Data Rates May Apply. See Terms and Conditions of Use). People seeking assistance remain anonymous and provide only their first name and ZIP code, which enables the service to link them to a counselor in the area who is knowledgeable about available local resources.

Provider Guidance for Testing

Background

Health care providers are strongly encouraged to test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), when patients present with any signs or symptoms consistent with COVID-19 or have had a known exposure to a person with COVID-19 infection. Due to the nonspecific clinical presentation of COVID-19 and the potential for co-infection with other pathogens, every symptomatic person should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis and testing decisions should be based on the patient’s personal health history. Because many COVID-19 cases have been observed in persons who originally discounted their symptoms due to other existing health conditions, e.g., allergies, prompt and early diagnosis of COVID-19 infection is strongly recommended to prevent further transmission.

Medical Care for Sexual Assault Survivors

Illinois Hospitals Are Ready and Safe for Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Survivors to Receive Medical Care

Sexual assault and domestic violence survivors come to hospitals to seek important medical and forensic care in their most vulnerable moments. During these tumultuous times, it is imperative that survivors know hospitals remain committed to providing these essential services to survivors who seek them. Hospitals work in collaboration with Illinois Coalition Against Sexual Assault rape crisis centers, the Illinois Coalition Against Domestic Violence, and other advocacy organizations to assist survivors.

Routine Oral and Dental Care

Revised Interim Guidance: Provision of Routine Oral and Dental Care

On May 11, 2020, Illinois Department of Public Health’s (IDPH) guidance to limit oral and dental care to emergency and urgent oral and dental care needs was revised. IDPH recommends oral health providers resume the provision of routine oral and dental care consistent with this guidance for minimizing risk of transmission of COVID-19 in an oral health care setting.

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