IDPH COVID-19 Guidance

Personal Protective Equipment Conservation

The Illinois Department of Public Health is recommending all hospitals and emergency medical services’ (EMS) providers to immediately elevate conservation and contingency strategies relating to personal protective equipment (PPE). Use this guidance to conserve PPE wherever allows, while ensuring the safety of health care personnel. Receiving hospitals remain the responsible party for permitting EMS to restock equipment or supplies after transporting patients.

Personal Protective Equipment Donations

To maximize the availability of personal protective equipment (PPE), the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) released guidance to hospitals and outpatient surgical and procedural centers on March 17, 2020 to limit non-essential adult elective surgery and medical and surgical procedures, including all dental procedures, until further notice. These considerations were requested to assist in limiting the consumption of vital health care resources during the COVID-19 public health emergency.

IDPH is encouraging outpatient surgical and procedural centers, ambulatory surgical treatment centers, and veterinarians to donate unused PPE not immediately needed to assist health care providers, health care facilities, and first responders who are on the front line and actively responding to COVID-19.

Personal Protective EquipmentPE Guidance for COVID-19 in Long- Term Care Settings

Recommended Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for COVID-19 in Long-Term Care Facilities

None to Minimum Community Transmission of COVID-19 (Less than 5% Test Positivity)

Resident Categories of Care
PPE to be worn for the care of the resident in: Resident NOT in TBP for any reason. NO potentially AGP being done Resident NOT in TBP for any reason but, DOES have potentially AGP such as CPAP/BIPAP, Nebulizers Resident in TBP for pathogen other than COVID and DOES have potentially AGP such as CPAP/BIPAP, Nebulizers Resident in TBP for suspected or confirmed COVID-19
All routine care and potentially AGP such as CPAP/BIPAP, Nebulizers

Phase 5 Guidance for Businesses and Venues

This guidance replaces the industry-specific guidance that the Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity published as part of the state’s Restore Illinois plan. This guidance includes recommendations for all types of businesses and venues, customers, and employees in order to help maintain healthy environments and operations, as well as lower the risk of COVID-19 spread.

The following are recommended prevention strategies that recognize that while the state of Illinois has made substantial progress in vaccinating its residents, a number of individuals remain ineligible or have not yet chosen to be vaccinated. Consistent use of prevention strategies will help reduce the spread of COVID-19 and protect people who are not fully vaccinated, including customers, employees, and their families. As always, businesses and local municipalities may choose to implement additional prevention strategies as they deem appropriate.

Plumbing Systems and Water Quality Guidance

The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) Plumbing and Water Quality Program has issued this memorandum to building owners and operators, and public water supply operators to provide guidance for maintaining water quality and safety in building water systems and in potable water distribution systems during periods of reduced use and considerations for returning building water systems to regular use.

Audience:

Potential Exposure

What to do if you were potentially exposed to someone with confirmed coronavirus disease (COVID-19)

If you think you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, follow the steps below to monitor your health and to avoid spreading the disease to others.

How do I know if I was exposed?

You generally need to be in close contact with a person with COVID-19 to get infected. Close contact includes:

Pregnant Women and Newborns

Purpose

This guidance provides recommendations for the care of pregnant women and newborns during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Prehospital Considerations

Pregnant patients who have confirmed COVID-19, who are persons under investigation (PUIs), or who have active symptoms of COVID-19 should notify the obstetric unit prior to arrival so the facility can make appropriate infection control preparations.  These preparations include  identifying the most appropriate room for labor and delivery, ensuring infection prevention and control supplies and personal protective equipment (PPE) are correctly positioned, and informing health care personnel who will be involved in the patient’s care of infection control expectations.

Quarantine Guidance

On December 2, 2020, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new options for public health authorities to consider for establishing quarantine time frames for contacts of persons with SARS-CoV-2. Click here to review the full details on these new options.

The CDC currently recommends a quarantine period of 14 days. Further, local public health authorities determine and establish quarantine options for their jurisdictions and may decide to continue using a 14-day period and/or shortened options for certain lower risk close contacts. However, the following options to shorten quarantine are acceptable alternatives:

Releasing COVID-19 Cases from Isolation and Quarantine

COVID-19 Cases and Contacts

Status of Individual Cases Close Contacts
Identified as a COVID-19 case. Isolation and transmission based (TBP) precautions for 10 days.
Can be discontinued 10 days after symptom onset* (for symptomatic person) or specimen collection date of positive test (for asymptomatic person) AND if resolution of fever for at least 24 hours, without the use of fever-reducing medications, and with improvement of other symptoms.
Close contacts of the case should be in quarantine as described below.
Identified as a COVID-19 case and has severe illness or immunocompromising condition.

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