Provider Guidance for Testing

Background

Health care providers are strongly encouraged to test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), when patients present with any signs or symptoms consistent with COVID-19 or have had a known exposure to a person with COVID-19 infection. Due to the nonspecific clinical presentation of COVID-19 and the potential for co-infection with other pathogens, every symptomatic person should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis and testing decisions should be based on the patient’s personal health history. Because many COVID-19 cases have been observed in persons who originally discounted their symptoms due to other existing health conditions, e.g., allergies, prompt and early diagnosis of COVID-19 infection is strongly recommended to prevent further transmission.

Rapid Point-Of-Care Testing for COVID-19 in Community Settings and Schools

Background

This guidance addresses use of rapid point-of-care testing in schools and other community settings either when testing is being administered in school health-based clinics, onsite by trained healthcare workers, or in pharmacies or health care facilities. This guidance is being released in conjunction with the state’s distribution of Abbott BinaxNOW tests to local health departments, schools and other settings. The BinaxNOW test is one of several rapid point-of-care antigen tests that are available and in use right now. This guidance is also applicable to other types of tests as described below.

Music Guidance

Interim COVID-19 Music Guidance

The available evidence for COVID-19 transmission from singing or playing instruments is limited.1 The extent to which group singing or playing of wind instruments increases the risk for COVID-19 transmission remains unclear. However, measures to reduce the potential risk of transmission include organizing sessions to minimize duration of interactions and contact with contaminated objects and surfaces, maintaining physical distancing of at least 6 feet, utilizing source control measures (e.g., face coverings and masks) and optimizing ventilation. The following recommendations are based on the latest results and science around current aerosol studies and represent best practices for preventing COVID-19 transmission among faculty, students, and staff engaged in music.

Child Face Coverings in Schools

Guidance for Evaluating a Child’s Medical Tolerance for use of Face Coverings in Schools

As schools consider whether and how to safely re-open during the COVID-19 pandemic, school physicals are an opportunity to assess whether a student is able to medically tolerate the use of a face covering. There are currently many questions regarding the criteria used by pediatric providers to determine whether a child is able to medically tolerate the use of a face covering. In reviewing recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, the American Lung Association, and the American Academy of Pediatrics, pediatric providers may determine a child is medically unable to tolerate a face covering for the following main reasons:

Guidance for Pre-K-12 Schools and Day Care Programs for Addressing COVID-19

Procedures for Students, Faculty and Support Staff who Test Positive:

An immediate notification should be sent to the school/day care from the parent, faculty, or support staff, and this reporting requirement should be communicated to all in advance.

The school/day care should send an immediate written notification to the Local Health Department (LHD) and begin discussions on next steps; the school/day care should share with the LHD all available information about the case’s movements and potential exposures within the facility. This includes:

Sports Safety Guidance

Day Care Guidance

On March 9, Governor Pritzker declared all counties in Illinois a disaster area in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Executive Order 2020-10 called for the suspension of all licensed day care centers, day care homes, and group day care homes in order to protect the health and safety of children and staff. On March 20, 2020, the Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) began issuing Emergency Day Care (EDC) Licenses to ensure licensed child care was available to children and families of essential workers, with an emphasis on those in health care, public health, human services, law enforcement, public safety, and first responder fields. On May 29, 2020, the Governor announced Restore Illinois, a comprehensive phased plan to safely reopen the State’s economy, get people back to work, and ease social restrictions. Child care is a critical component of getting Illinois back to work.

Restoring Illinois – Protecting Our Communities FAQs

On May 5, Gov. JB Pritzker released Restore Illinois, a five-phased plan to reopen our state, guided by health metrics and with distinct business, education, and recreation activities characterizing each phase. Beginning Friday, June 26, each region in the state entered Phase 4 of the plan. For more information about Restore Illinois and Phase 4, see below.

About the Plan

Who put the plan together?

Governor Pritzker worked closely with medical and public health experts at the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) and received feedback from public health and hospital partners as well as local elected officials, mayors, and businesses who have been in regular communication with the administration.

Workplace Health and Safety Guidance for Employees and Staff of Businesses

Practice Social Distancing

Pursuant to Executive Order, your employer must comply to the greatest extent feasible with social distancing requirements. This means that your employer should:

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